Proposed flags of Australia

Flags

SUMMARY

Here are all the Australian flag designs I made over the years. Like my New Zealand flag proposals, I put in a lot of effort researching and designing these proposals. Australia has not had an official flag competition or referendum yet but I’ll be ready once it happens!

Everyone else just makes designs that look nice and symbolic to them personally. This is why they fail. Instead, I consulted real evidence for what people want and don’t want in a flag, and aimed for maximum feasibility, i.e. appealing to as much of the public as possible with their various preferences. The concepts are roughly in order from most to least feasible, based on my evidence and the popularity on Facebook and Reddit.

The Advance (green) design (top-right) was voted the third best Australian flag proposal by the Change The Aussie Flag Facebook group. I will leave it up to the reader to decide which designs are the best.

01b Australian flag design summary

INTRODUCTION

As with all design, the how and the why is more important than the what. I used the same process as my New Zealand flag designs so I’ll just summarise that here.

After that, the article lists each of my proposals.

CONTENTS

1. Design Process

1.1 Overall Methodology

1.2 Deal-Breakers

1.3 The Four Symbolic Themes

1.4 Regression Analysis

1.5 Survey of Public Preferences

2. Most Popular Designs

2.1 Advance (green)

2.2 Golden Arrow

2.3 Southern Colours

2.1 Vox Populi

3. Other Concepts

3.1 Advance (red)

3.2 Reconciliate and Advance

3.3 Triptych

3.4 Sun and Stars

3.5 Dotted Sun and Stars

3.6 The Ancient Land

References

 

1. DESIGN PROCESS

1.1 Overall Methodology

The reason why a lot of existing Australian flag proposals suck is because they don’t have a proper methodology. I didn’t want to just sit down and design a good Australian flag. This is short-sighted and only reflects my own preferences. I want to design the new Australian flag, not a new Australian flag.

Instead, I aimed for maximum feasibility (i.e. appealing to as much of the public as possible with their various preferences, based on evidence of what people want and don’t want in a new flag) rather than just making something that looked nice and symbolic to me personally.

Instead of activating the aesthetic part of my brain and asking what resonates with me, I activated the sympathy part of my brain and asked what resonates with others. To fully ground this, I did a lot of research.

This research included studying every single existing Australian flag proposal, noting the common features, reading all the feedback and analysing why some designs were more popular than others. I also looked at Australian themed insignia, logos and graphics. Finally, I consulted surveys and campaigns.

1.2 Deal-Breakers

By collating all the commentary behind existing proposals, I listed all the common mistakes so I could transcend them all. You can read more about these in the main article The Six Little-Known Deal-Breakers of Bad Flag Design which was presented to NAVA and won an award.

  • Generally bad flag design – Too complicated, too many colours or elements, irrelevant symbolism and so on.
  • Looks like a logo, not a flag – By far the most common. A flag should actually look like a flag, not a corporate logo stuck into a rectangle.
  • Cheesy souvenir – Flags relying on informal elements can look like souvenirs.
  • Mystery symbolism – Roger Ebert once declared, “If you have to ask what it symbolizes, it didn’t.”
  • Designing for yourself – A lot of designers only included the themes of national identity that appealed to them, not the general public.
  • Too radical – Making a completely revolutionary design is self-sabotage. A lot of people are intimately attached to established symbolism.
  • It’s boring, but it works – Trying to satisfy everybody will end up satisfying nobody.

1.3 The Four Symbolic Themes

What are the themes of national identity? I identified four of them.

  • Established symbolism – Elements from the current flag. The red, white and blue colour scheme, the commonwealth star and the southern cross. To some these are familiar and formal but to others these are too safe and boring.
  • Colloquial symbolism – Elements from local, informal culture. The green and gold colour scheme and the kangaroo. To some these are unique and authentic but to others these are too cheesy and offbeat.
  • Aboriginal symbolism – Elements from indigenous cultures. The red/ochre, white and black colour scheme, the colour red/ochre by itself, the sun, dotted patterns and the boomerang. To some these are culturally significant but to others these are too sectarian.
  • Environmental symbolism – Elements from nature. The colour green, landscapes, the sun and the kangaroo. To some these are positive and fresh but to others these are too trendy and informal.

By clarifying these, I can make designs that harmoniously appeal to multiple themes, which will resonate with more people. The “established symbolism” has the most appeal so an effective design will have to focus on this.

The themes are summarised in the Euler diagram below.

The four symbolic themes of Australian graphical identity.

The four symbolic themes of Australian graphical identity.

1.4 Regression Analysis

Flag proposals have sometimes competed in head-to-head in ranked competitions or discussions. I used a statistical technique called a “regression analysis” to identify which elements (colours and symbols) are most associated with success (public resonance). These successful elements are the colours red, white, blue and gold, and the southern cross in its current form (i.e. white on blue).

I will note the caveat that some of these competitions were from years ago, so the conclusions may be a little dated. The preference for red, white and blue is obviously quite conservative. Newer surveys tend to reveal preferences for green and gold instead (see the section below).

1.5 Survey of Public Preferences

A 2016 University of Western Sydney survey asked the Australian public what they wanted in a new flag (Jones, 2016). Results:

  • The most common requests were “simplicity”, “Southern Cross”, and “Green and Gold”.
  • Respondents were split between those who wanted recognition of indigenous cultures and those who wanted a culturally neutral design.
  • When presented with a few examples, respondents preferred designs that were similar to the current flag in layout.

Some have also asked about indigenous viewpoints and consultation. A 1994 survey asked indigenous groups across the country what they wanted in a new flag (Mee, 2018). These were universal responses:

  • They though the issue was quite pressing.
  • They did not want the Union Jack.
  • They wanted it to feature indigenous cultures in some way.
  • They did not want the Aboriginal flag included in its entirety.

However, opinions varied on how exactly they wanted their cultures to be represented visually.

A 1998 museum exhibition of national flag proposals included some designs featuring indigenous symbols like the Aboriginal colours (black, gold and red), dot patterns, a golden sun and the stripe layout of the Aboriginal flag. These proposals were specifically praised in a speech by Dr. Lowitja O’Donoghue, who at the time was the Chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, the highest national indigenous representative body. She made the following comment (O’Donoghue, 1998):

“[Overseas visitors] appreciate the unique aspects of our country including the contribution that Australia’s indigenous people make to our national identity. I’m pleased to see that many of the designs on display here today include a reference to indigenous culture, or the colours of the indigenous flags. But the most important thing is that our new flag should he acceptable to all of us.”

2. MOST POPULAR DESIGNS

The concepts are roughly in order from most to least feasible, starting with the most popular and balanced designs and ending with the most radical and peculiar designs. I will leave it up to the reader to decide which designs resonate the best with them personally.

The best symbolism is that which does not need to be explained, so I am confident in letting all of our flag designs speak for themselves.

I will still list their advantages:

  • Elegant enough to soar alongside other flags of the world. These designs actually look like flags.
  • Exceptional enough to be instantly distinguished, even at a distance.
  • Balanced enough to resonate with many Australians and their preferences. Reflects what Australians feel about Australia, rather than expressing what I personally feel about Australia.
  • Simple enough to be be remembered by a child.
  • Anchored on existent symbolism to establish continuity and aid recognition.
  • Meaningful enough to tell many stories.

Vector files available on request.

 

2.1 Advance (green)

This is a green version of Advance. In 2021, it was voted the third best Australian flag design on the Facebook group “Change the Aussie flag”.

Advance (green)

 

Mock-ups for Advance (green)

 

Construction sheet for Advance (green)

Construction sheet for Advance (green)

2.2 Golden Arrow

 

This design is a simplified version of Advance (green) that uses the Southern Cross as the main focus. It was almost voted one of the top Australian flag designs by the Facebook group “Change the Aussie Flag”, missing out by only one ranking.

Golden Arrow

 

Mock-ups for Golden Arrow

 

Construction sheet for Golden Arrow

2.3 Southern Colours

I designed this one with Matthew Doddrell. We both independently came up with a similar idea, and then we collaborated to make a compromise design with the best proportions and colours. He came up with the poetic name.

Southern Colours

 

Mock-ups for Southern Colours

 

Construction sheet for Southern Colours

2.4 Vox Populi

This design is directly based on the 2016 University of Western Sydney survey that asked the Australian public what they wanted in a new flag.

Vox Populi

Vox Populi

Name: The name “Vox Populi” is Latin for “voice of the people”. The name and the survey are part of the core identity of this flag, not just a side note. Appealing to existing consensus gives the flag a compelling power that other designs can’t match.

Survey details: Respondents asked for “simplicity”, “Southern Cross” and “Green and Gold”, and preferred designs similar to the current flag in layout.

They were split between those who wanted recognition of indigenous cultures and those who wanted a culturally neutral design. This isn’t a contradiction, it just requires cleverness, as there are symbols in the intersection of “universal symbolism” and “indigenous symbolism”. I used the sun, a universal symbol that appeals to every person and culture in Australia (it represents unity, nature, life-giving energy, outdoor joy and a bright future), but it has special significance to the indigenous cultures (it appears on the Aboriginal flag).

Out of all the possible ways to make a design directly based on the national survey, Vox Populi is the simplest, most faithful (satisfies all the requests), most familiar (similar to current flags) and most intuitive (the meaning is obvious).

States and territories: This design is also adaptable to the state and territory flags, which are also shown below.

Mock-ups of Vox Populi

Mock-ups for Vox Populi

 

Construction sheet for Vox Populi

Construction sheet for Vox Populi

 

State and territory flag variants for Vox Populi

State and territory flag variants for Vox Populi

3. OTHER CONCEPTS

These ones are not popular enough to be accepted by the public at large so they don’t count as my “main” proposals. I still present them for the sake of interest because some people did like them, as they are radical and memorable. I also still have an emotional attachment to them as a creator.

3.1 Advance (red)

Personally, I think this one is the simplest and most elegant of my proposals. If it seems annoyingly familiar, you are probably thinking of Captain Marvel.

Advance

Advance (red)

 

Mock-ups for Advance

Mock-ups for Advance (red)

 

Construction sheet for Advance

Construction sheet for Advance (red)

3.2 Reconciliate and Advance

This design was the most popular on Reddit and Facebook. It was actually the precursor to Advance (above). It has more explicit Aboriginal symbolism but has more colours.

Reconciliate and Advance

Reconciliate and Advance

 

Mock-ups for Reconciliate and Advance

Mock-ups for Reconciliate and Advance

 

Construction sheet for Reconciliate and Advance

Construction sheet for Reconciliate and Advance

3.3 Triptych

As the name suggests, this design is meant to be read as a three-part story from left to right. It has the most colours of all my designs but that’s deliberate.

Triptych

 

Mock-ups for Triptych

 

Construction sheet for Triptych

3.4 Sun and Stars

This one is also nice and simple. However, for some, it suffers from a lack of a single focus.

Sun and Stars

Sun and Stars

 

Mock-ups for Sun and Stars

Mock-ups for Sun and Stars

 

Construction sheet for Sun and Stars

Construction sheet for Sun and Stars

3.5 Dotted Sun and Stars

This design is the direct counterpart to my New Zealand flag proposal Flourishing Together.

This one was inspired by an Australian Aboriginal art exhibition in Vancouver. It incorporates that cultural influence without using the Aboriginal flag itself like many other concepts try to do. This one was said to be “too Aboriginal” to be accepted by Australia as a whole, which is probably true, but it looks too cool to not show it here.

Here I intended to combine the Commonwealth Star and the Aboriginal sun design in an elegant way. The current Commonwealth Star has seven points which I find to be clunky – currently, six points stand for the six original states and the seventh point stands for all territories and future states. Since this design did not need to appear conventional, I took the opportunity to update it to nine, which I feel is more appropriate and timeless: Eight points for the mainland states and territories and one point for external territories and allies. This makes more sense geographically and is future-proofed against the strong possibility of Northern Territory becoming a state.

Dotted Sun and Stars

Dotted Sun and Stars

 

Mock-ups for Dotted Sun and Stars

Mock-ups for Dotted Sun and Stars

 

Construction sheet for Dotted Sun and Stars

Construction sheet for Dotted Sun and Stars

3.6 The Ancient Land

Although I predicted that this design would be too radical of a change, it was modestly popular on Reddit and Facebook. When designing this flag, I deliberately ignored my analysis and the symbolism on the current flag. Instead, I allowed myself to be more eccentric and boundless.

I aimed for a flag that is intuitive, timeless and naturalistic. It peels back the layers and purely captures the distilled essence of what makes the Australian continent what it is. It represents Australia in an intuitive way that just hits you at first glance even without an explanation. Even if I sent this to the distant past or distant future, it would still be totally understandable at first glance. It emphasises the natural world which is neutral and can connect with all Australians.

Also, I specifically aimed aimed to use the kangaroo in a way that feels justified and not just gratuitously slapping it inside a rectangle out of obligation like some others’ proposals do.

Unfortunately, the result falls into the “cheesy souvenir” trap by virtue of including the kangaroo, but it is unique and has its own charm.

The Ancient Land

The Ancient Land

 

Mock-ups for The Ancient Land

Mock-ups for The Ancient Land

 

Construction sheet for The Ancient Land

Construction sheet for The Ancient Land

REFERENCES

View and share these concepts on other sites:

4 thoughts on “Proposed flags of Australia

  1. As someone with a foot on either side of the Ditch (Tasman Sea for those Not In The Know), I had to check these out. “Advance (green)” was a flag I felt I could salute as representing the Australia I know, from the arid inland to the fertile coast, from the tropical north to the temperate south.

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